Physical storage: The only real way to keep data secure – Digistor

Thursday, 31 October, 2013

Posted on October 14, 2013 by DIGISTOR

The recent, game-changing revelation of the National Security Agency’s surveillance initiatives, including its comprehensive PRISM program, have rekindled concerns about the safety of data that passes over the Internet and is stored in cloud services.

With individuals, enterprises and foreign governments like Brazil investing in offshore and/or private storage arrangements, companies must seize the opportunity to procure data archiving solutions like the DIGISTOR Enterprise Archive. Long term, offline storage via high-capacity Blu-ray Disc racks can protect sensitive data from Internet-based spying, while also making it easily accessible as needed. Additionally, companies can rest assured that they will not lose data or have it compromised because a cloud provider shuts down or is forced to hand information over to the federal government.

The NSA and the creation of national clouds
Highlighting the scope and gravity of the NSA’s efforts, Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff recently announced plans to create a fiber-optic cable that would connect South America and Europe – bypassing the U.S. altogether. Currently, most inbound traffic to South America passes through Miami, according to The Verge’s Amar Toor.

However, it is far from certain that creating and using a new cable will lead to real data privacy, and not only because of the U.S. submarines that can spy on underwater cables. Although Brazil and the Eurozone have both proposed national, self-contained cloud services to go along with the cable, such projects may be both technically infeasible and inherently vulnerable. Clouds and Internet traffic depend on data transmissions that often pass through many different locations, and become subject to surveillance.

“[The creation of national clouds] basically ignores the entire Internet,” said Ronaldo Lemos, director of Rio de Janeiro-based think thank the Institute for Technology & Society, according to The Wall Street Journal. “This data has to circulate. It is going to be sent to Miami, to Europe. It is not going to be sitting idle.”

Keeping data safe offline
Rather than put their data on the cloud, companies can likely save the money they would have spent on pay-as-you-go arrangements and instead utilize offline storage media. Ideal solutions includeDIGISTOR Blu-ray recordable media, archiving tools and SSD drives for housing backups and high-density files

Speaking to CRN, Land Computer president Richard Trahant highlighted the lax attitude that businesses have taken toward cloud security, as well as the possible issues that NSA surveillance creates for remotely hosted storage.

“Our clients entrust us with the security of their data, and to have the U.S. and possibly other countries going into the data, who knows what they would do with the data,” said Trahant.

Since data shared over networks and in the cloud can be so easily scrutinized, physical media is the only surefire way to ensure data privacy. Media like Blu-ray Discs are both affordable and highly portable, making them ideal for companies that would prefer not to gamble with a cloud provider or resort to less reliable formats like tape and magnetic hard drives.

 

Retrieved from: http://blog.digistor.com/physical-storage-the-only-real-way-to-keep-data-secure/

M-Disc: A New Product for Data Backup Day – Thomas MacEntee

Wednesday, 30 October, 2013

Posted on 1 October 2013 by Thomas MacEntee

Today is Data Backup Day when many genealogists and family historians take time to ensure that they don’t lose access to their research data, scanned photos and more. Check out our Data Backup Resources here at GeneaBloggers and make backing up your genealogy data a regular habit.

How the Yours.co M-DISC™ is Different

When was the last time you tried to use some of your older CDs or DVDs which you used to store data?  Did you know that the coating on most data DVDs can degrade over time? Most writable DVDs, including the most expensive “Gold” archival DVDs, burn data into an organic dye layer. Organic dyes start to degrade and fade as soon as they are written. This leads to a condition called “data rot”. This problem is so severe that the National Archives warns that the shelf life of a regular DVD is 2-5 years. The M-DISC™ contains no organic dyes. Instead, the M-DISC™’s data layer is composed of rock-like materials known to last for centuries. The M-DISC READY™ Drive etches the M-DISC™’s rock-like layer creating a permanent physical data record that is immune to data rot.

Writing to and Reading the M-DISC™

Leading computer manufacturers such as LG, Acer, and Dell already offer the M-DISC™ Ready Drive with their newer systems. See Currently Available M-DISC™ Ready Drives to determine if your drive will work with the M-DISC™. You can also shop for portable M-DISC™ Ready Drives at Amazon including this LG Electronics 8X USB 2.0 Ultra Slim Portable DVD+/-RW External Drive with M-DISC Support.

 

And a M-DISC READY™ Drive engraves the M-DISC™ using a compatible data format that can be read by most quality DVD drives.

Click Here for Information about Yours.co and M-DISC™

 

 

 

http://geneabloggers.com/mdisc-product-data-backup-day/

 

M-Disc by Yours.co: The 1,000 Year Archival Solution – TheFamilyCurator.com

Wednesday, 30 October, 2013

M-Disc the 1,000 Year Archival Solution – Tech Tuesday Review

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2013

Right now, I have a stack of cassette tapes on my desk that need to be digitized and archived. I want those files readable in 25, 30, 50, or 100 years, and I don’t want to have to worry about migrating from CD to CD or from one cloud service to another. I’m pretty excited about the M-Disc from Yours.co — a new kind of archival disc that promises Write Once, Read Forever.

Until recently, family historians had to rely on multiple copies and regular updating to insure the good health and accessibility of digital files. The M-Disc is a game-changer that brings long-term media storage to the home computer user in the popular DVD and Blu-ray format. The National Archives notes a 2 to 5 year life expectancy for CD/DVD media; M-Disc is rated to last at least 1,000 years and survived rigorous testing by the U.S. Department of Defense Naval Air Warfare Weapon’s Division at China Lake, California

 

The M-Disc records by engraving data on a single rock-hard layer, unlike conventional discs that record using organic dyes susceptible to fading and decay. If you’ve ever tried to read the files on a CD or DVD left on a car dashboard or forgotten on top of a CD player, you know that heat, humidity, and light can quickly destroy digital storage media. In contrast, the M-Disc is designed for longevity with materials resistant to oxidation and decay.

The M-Disc looks different than a regular DVD — it’s transparent. Hold it up to the light and you can see through the disc.

 

This special disc technology requires an M-Disc compatible writer that can etch the rock-like layer of the M-Disc. I didn’t have any difficulty using the LG Blu-ray BP40NS20 M-Disc-Ready burner sent to me by Yours.co with a pack of sample discs. The plug-and-play disc writer worked on both my iMac and Dell Windows 8 laptop; the included software is Windows only, but the writer was able to burn the M-Disc using my standard computer DVD software.

I tested the M-Disc by burning the same set of files to an M-Disc using the PC and then the iMac. After successfully burning the discs, I was able to read both discs in either computer.

I also tried to burn the M-Disc using the regular iMac and Dell DVD burners and found that the disc was not recognized. You really do need an M-Disc Ready DVD writer to create the M-Disc, but the disc can be read by any computer CD/DVD reader. The M-Disc is designed for archiving files and does not allow erasing files.

M-Disc Ready Drives are available in internal and externl models, and some PC computers are already offering the drives as a standard feature. Check the full list of compatible drives here.

The M-Disc is available with 4.7GB capacity. If you have only JPEG image files, you will be able to archive thousands of images. According to Milleniata, on average, one disc can store

▪   8,000 photos [JPEG],

▪   240 minutes of video, or

▪   over 100,000 documents

My digital image files are mostly archival TIFF format, and very large files. On average a 600 dpi color scan might be 20 to 30 MB, many times the files are considerably larger. For instance, each scanned page of a 7 x 10-inch photo album is about 70 MB. One 4.7 DVD will hold about 60 of these extra-large TIFF images, or all of my digitized cassette tapes.

 

Large file size translates into more discs or hard drives. Economical, efficient storage is important to me. I would much prefer to archive once to a disc, instead of regularly migrating files to new fresh DVDs. With one copy of my files online, one copy on an external hard drive, and one copy recorded to the archival M-Disc, I will have less work maintaining my digital archive.

 

M-Disc longevity is appealing to anyone interested in long-term archival solutions. It’s always a good idea to keep multiple copies of digital files, but any media that prolongs the life of the initial file makes preservation easier to manage over time.

 

Read more about M-Disc technology and Department of Defense testing at the M-Disc website www.mdisc.com

And go to Yours.co to start protecting your memories today.

 

 http://www.thefamilycurator.com/home/2013/10/22/m-disc-the-1000-year-archival-solution-tech-tuesday-review.html#.UnE3OJHq4Za

M-Disc: The 1,000 Year Archival Solution – TheFamilyCurator.com

Wednesday, 30 October, 2013

M-Disc the 1,000 Year Archival Solution – Tech Tuesday Review

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2013

Right now, I have a stack of cassette tapes on my desk that need to be digitized and archived. I want those files readable in 25, 30, 50, or 100 years, and I don’t want to have to worry about migrating from CD to CD or from one cloud service to another. I’m pretty excited about the M-Disc from Millenniata — a new kind of archival disc that promises Write Once, Read Forever.

Until recently, family historians had to rely on multiple copies and regular updating to insure the good health and accessibility of digital files. The M-Disc (Millennial Disc) is a game-changer that brings long-term media storage to the home computer user in the popular DVD and Blu-ray format. The National Archives notes a 2 to 5 year life expectancy for CD/DVD media; M-Disc is rated to last at least 1,000 years and survived rigorous testing by the U.S. Department of Defense Naval Air Warfare Weapon’s Division at China Lake, California

 

The M-Disc records by engraving data on a single rock-hard layer, unlike conventional discs that record using organic dyes susceptible to fading and decay. If you’ve ever tried to read the files on a CD or DVD left on a car dashboard or forgotten on top of a CD player, you know that heat, humidity, and light can quickly destroy digital storage media. In contrast, the M-Disc is designed for longevity with materials resistant to oxidation and decay.

The M-Disc looks different than a regular DVD — it’s transparent. Hold it up to the light and you can see through the disc.

 

This special disc technology requires an M-Disc compatible writer that can etch the rock-like layer of the M-Disc. I didn’t have any difficulty using the LG Blu-ray BP40NS20 M-Disc-Ready burner sent to me by Millenniata with a pack of sample discs. The plug-and-play disc writer worked on both my iMac and Dell Windows 8 laptop; the included software is Windows only, but the writer was able to burn the M-Disc using my standard computer DVD software.

I tested the M-Disc by burning the same set of files to an M-Disc using the PC and then the iMac. After successfully burning the discs, I was able to read both discs in either computer.

I also tried to burn the M-Disc using the regular iMac and Dell DVD burners and found that the disc was not recognized. You really do need an M-Disc Ready DVD writer to create the M-Disc, but the disc can be read by any computer CD/DVD reader. The M-Disc is designed for archiving files and does not allow erasing files.

M-Disc Ready Drives are available in internal and externl models, and some PC computers are already offering the drives as a standard feature. Check the full list of compatible drives here.

The M-Disc is available with 4.7GB capacity. If you have only JPEG image files, you will be able to archive thousands of images. According to Milleniata, on average, one disc can store

▪   8,000 photos [JPEG],

▪   240 minutes of video, or

▪   over 100,000 documents

My digital image files are mostly archival TIFF format, and very large files. On average a 600 dpi color scan might be 20 to 30 MB, many times the files are considerably larger. For instance, each scanned page of a 7 x 10-inch photo album is about 70 MB. One 4.7 DVD will hold about 60 of these extra-large TIFF images, or all of my digitized cassette tapes.

 

Large file size translates into more discs or hard drives. Economical, efficient storage is important to me. I would much prefer to archive once to a disc, instead of regularly migrating files to new fresh DVDs. With one copy of my files online, one copy on an external hard drive, and one copy recorded to the archival M-Disc, I will have less work maintaining my digital archive.

 

M-Disc longevity is appealing to anyone interested in long-term archival solutions. It’s always a good idea to keep multiple copies of digital files, but any media that prolongs the life of the initial file makes preservation easier to manage over time.

 

Read more about M-Disc technology and Department of Defense testing at the M-Disc website www.mdisc.com

 

 http://www.thefamilycurator.com/home/2013/10/22/m-disc-the-1000-year-archival-solution-tech-tuesday-review.html#.UnE3OJHq4Za

Yours.co creates Blu-ray disc guaranteed to last 1000 years – Techtonic Guides

Thursday, 13 June, 2013

Millenniata(yours.co) has announced its new Blu-ray disc that stores data on a layer made of metals and metalloids instead of organic light-sensitive dyes so it will last about 1000 years. Standard DVDs last a median of three years, but these discs were tested to last a median of 1332 years.

There are already DVDs available that can last this long, but this is the first Blu-ray disc that can store 25GB instead of only 4.7GB and it can be read and written using a standard Blu-ray drive. The Blu-ray disc will go into mass production in early August 2013.

Learn more by visiting yours.co

Millenniata creates Blu-ray disc guaranteed to last 1000 years – Techtonic Guides

Thursday, 13 June, 2013

Millenniata has announced its new Blu-ray disc that stores data on a layer made of metals and metalloids instead of organic light-sensitive dyes so it will last about 1000 years. Standard DVDs last a median of three years, but these discs were tested to last a median of 1332 years.

There are already DVDs available that can last this long, but this is the first Blu-ray disc that can store 25GB instead of only 4.7GB and it can be read and written using a standard Blu-ray drive. The Blu-ray disc will go into mass production in early August 2013.

Learn more on the M-DISC website here.

Yours.co, Ritek Produce New 25GB Blu-ray – HomeMediaMagazine

Thursday, 13 June, 2013

6 Jun, 2013By: Chris Tribbey


Utah-based tech company Yours.co has completed its new 25GB M-Disc Blu-ray Disc, with Ritek Corp. beginning mass production in August.

The M-Disc Blu-ray has five times the storage capacity of the standard 4.7 GB M-Disc DVD and will be writable and readable on any Blu-ray drive. Imation will distribute the M-Discs under the TDK, Memorex and Imation brands, while Ritek will distribute them under the Ritek, Ridata and Traxdata brands.

“The new M-Disc Blu-ray and its 25GB of storage enhances our ability to meet the ever-growing digital storage needs of consumers,” said Paul Brockbank, Yours.co president and CEO. “Now businesses, as well as individuals, can take advantage of both the added capacity and accessibility of the permanent M-Disc.”

Click Here to learn more!

Millenniata, Ritek Produce New 25GB Blu-ray – HomeMediaMagazine

Thursday, 13 June, 2013

6 Jun, 2013By: Chris Tribbey


Utah-based tech company Millenniata has completed its new 25GB M-Disc Blu-ray Disc, with Ritek Corp. beginning mass production in August.

The M-Disc Blu-ray has five times the storage capacity of the standard 4.7 GB M-Disc DVD and will be writable and readable on any Blu-ray drive. Imation will distribute the M-Discs under the TDK, Memorex and Imation brands, while Ritek will distribute them under the Ritek, Ridata and Traxdata brands.

“The new M-Disc Blu-ray and its 25GB of storage enhances our ability to meet the ever-growing digital storage needs of consumers,” said Paul Brockbank, Millenniata president and CEO. “Now businesses, as well as individuals, can take advantage of both the added capacity and accessibility of the permanent M-Disc.”

Yours.co Completes New 25GB Blu-ray Optical DISC – AZOoptics

Thursday, 13 June, 2013

Published on June 6, 2013 at 8:27 AM

U.S.-based Millenniata(Yours.co) today announced the completion of its new 25GB M-DISC Blu-ray, with mass production to begin in early August 2013.

RITEK Corporation, the leading manufacturer of optical storage media in the world, will begin production of the new M-DISC Blu-ray as part of its manufacturing agreement with Yours.co. Imation and RITEK will distribute and market the M-DISC Blu-ray through their established distribution and reseller channels. Imation will distribute under the TDK, Memorex and Imation brands, and RITEK will distribute under the RITEK, Ridata and Traxdata brands.

With the addition of the new 25GB M-DISC Blu-ray to its products, Yours.co has significantly expanded the breadth of the market addressed by its permanent data storage solution, greatly increasing the storage capacity, ease-of-access and usability of the M-DISC. The M-DISC Blu-ray offers five times the storage capacity of the standard 4.7GB M-DISC DVD, and is writable and readable on any Blu-ray drive – an enormous step for Yours.co and the convenience of this permanent storage technology.

“The new M-DISC Blu-ray and its 25GB of storage enhances our ability to meet the ever-growing digital storage needs of consumers,” said Paul Brockbank, Yours.co president and CEO. “Now businesses, as well as individuals, can take advantage of both the added capacity and accessibility of the permanent M-DISC.”

In addition, Yours.co recently completed an extensive test program of the M-DISC technology based on the ISO/IEC 10995 Standard. This patented technology is at the core of both the M-DISC DVD and the M-DISC Blu-ray. The test evaluates the life span of optical media such as DVD and Blu-ray. Yours.co tested the M-DISC DVD, as well as several other high-quality archival DVDs.

The test results verify Yours.co’s claim that the M-DISC DVD lasts in excess of 1,000 years, indicating that the median expected life of the M-DISC DVD is 1,332 years. Other DVDs that claim to have a median expected life of 30 to 100 years lasted only a fraction of their purported lifespans, with a median expected life of only 2.7 to 3.0 years.

“With results like these, it’s not surprising that many consumers don’t immediately think of optical storage when they want to preserve their data,” said Brockbank. “The results of this test show that M-DISC technology is in a class of its own.”

The ISO/IEC 10995 Test Standard, which exposes optical media to high temperature and humidity conditions for extended periods of time to determine a product’s lifetime, is common in electronics, automotive and many other industries.

Click here to learn more!

Millenniata Completes New 25GB Blu-ray Optical DISC – AZOoptics

Thursday, 13 June, 2013

Published on June 6, 2013 at 8:27 AM

U.S.-based Millenniata today announced the completion of its new 25GB M-DISC Blu-ray, with mass production to begin in early August 2013.

RITEK Corporation, the leading manufacturer of optical storage media in the world, will begin production of the new M-DISC Blu-ray as part of its manufacturing agreement with Millenniata. Imation and RITEK will distribute and market the M-DISC Blu-ray through their established distribution and reseller channels. Imation will distribute under the TDK, Memorex and Imation brands, and RITEK will distribute under the RITEK, Ridata and Traxdata brands.

With the addition of the new 25GB M-DISC Blu-ray to its products, Millenniata has significantly expanded the breadth of the market addressed by its permanent data storage solution, greatly increasing the storage capacity, ease-of-access and usability of the M-DISC. The M-DISC Blu-ray offers five times the storage capacity of the standard 4.7GB M-DISC DVD, and is writable and readable on any Blu-ray drive – an enormous step for Millenniata and the convenience of this permanent storage technology.

“The new M-DISC Blu-ray and its 25GB of storage enhances our ability to meet the ever-growing digital storage needs of consumers,” said Paul Brockbank, Millenniata president and CEO. “Now businesses, as well as individuals, can take advantage of both the added capacity and accessibility of the permanent M-DISC.”

In addition, Millenniata recently completed an extensive test program of the M-DISC technology based on the ISO/IEC 10995 Standard. This patented technology is at the core of both the M-DISC DVD and the M-DISC Blu-ray. The test evaluates the life span of optical media such as DVD and Blu-ray. Millenniata tested the M-DISC DVD, as well as several other high-quality archival DVDs.

The test results verify Millenniata’s claim that the M-DISC DVD lasts in excess of 1,000 years, indicating that the median expected life of the M-DISC DVD is 1,332 years. Other DVDs that claim to have a median expected life of 30 to 100 years lasted only a fraction of their purported lifespans, with a median expected life of only 2.7 to 3.0 years.

“With results like these, it’s not surprising that many consumers don’t immediately think of optical storage when they want to preserve their data,” said Brockbank. “The results of this test show that M-DISC technology is in a class of its own.”

The ISO/IEC 10995 Test Standard, which exposes optical media to high temperature and humidity conditions for extended periods of time to determine a product’s lifetime, is common in electronics, automotive and many other industries.

Source: http://www.mdisc.com/